Iyar Print 12 x 16
Iyar Print (12×16)

The embers of Iyar ignite this smaller print. Details: This museum-quality print is made on thick and durable matte paper. • Paper thickness: 10.3 mil • Paper weight: 5.57 oz/y² (189 g/m²) • Giclée printing quality • Opacity: 94%

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Iyar Print 18 x 24
Iyar Print (18×24)

The flames of Iyar ignite this medium print. Details: This museum-quality print is made on thick and durable matte paper. • Paper thickness: 10.3 mil • Paper weight: 5.57 oz/y² (189 g/m²) • Giclée printing quality • Opacity: 94%

$27.99 Add to cart
Iyar Print 24 x 36
Iyar Print (24 x 36)

The blaze of Iyar ignites this larger print. Details: This museum-quality print is made on thick and durable matte paper. • Paper thickness: 10.3 mil • Paper weight: 5.57 oz/y² (189 g/m²) • Giclée printing quality • Opacity: 94%

$32.99 Add to cart

Notable Events

Holiday of Lag B'Omer (represented by a boy’s upsherin (first haircut), a bow and arrow, bonfire on arrowhead), death of Shimon bar Yachai (symbolized by Kabbalistic Tree of Life on the carob tree that sustained him while in the cave studying)

A spring month, Iyar is all about new beginnings and second chances—thus, there are many references to rebirth and the number two:

  • An Upsherin, traditional first haircut for Jewish boys, marking their entrance into formal Jewish education (bottom left)
  • The rededication of the walls of Jerusalem, after they were initially destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (bottom right)
  • Pesach Sheni, the sacrifice for people who were ritually impure during Passover (the two altars; top left)
  • A bow and arrow, representing God giving humanity a second chance; a symbol of Lag B’Omer, it itself references when God displayed a rainbow after almost destroying the entire world with the flood. It supposedly was like a bow and arrow pointed away from the Earth (middle)
  • Shimon Bar Yochai himself was given a second lease on life, fleeing to safety after the Roman government put a death warrant on his head for his criticism of their rule. Legend has it that he found refuge in a cave, and a carob tree and spring miraculously burst forth and sustained him. It is said that he developed Kabbalah, or Jewish mysticism, while in his cave exile
  • The Kabbalah discusses the Tree of Life and the Tree of Death, the bow and arrow has been drawn into light and dark areas, accordingly
  • The kabbalistic symbol of the hamsa, also adorning the bow and arrow, reference the two hands
  • The three angels who visited Abraham, giving his wife Sarah a second chance at a child
  • Many iterations of the number two: two animals (donkey and bull), two loads on the donkey representing Issachar, two people (child and old man), two of each instrument, and two altars
  • On Yaakov’s deathbed, he compared his son Issachar to a donkey with two loads, who finds it more comfortable to settle down than carry on (meaning he preferred to study, compared to his counterpart Zebulun who became a merchant).