Nissan Print 12 x 16
Nissan Print (12×16)

A kid-sized (that’s a goat joke) print. Details: This museum-quality print is made on thick and durable matte paper. • Paper thickness: 10.3 mil • Paper weight: 5.57 oz/y² (189 g/m²) • Giclée printing quality • Opacity: 94%

$25.99 Add to cart
Nissan Print 18 x 24
Nissan Print (18×24)

A doe-sized print. Details: This museum-quality print is made on thick and durable matte paper. • Paper thickness: 10.3 mil • Paper weight: 5.57 oz/y² (189 g/m²) • Giclée printing quality • Opacity: 94%

$27.99 Add to cart
Nissan Print 24 x 36
Nissan Print (24 x 36)

A buck-sized print. Details: This museum-quality print is made on thick and durable matte paper. • Paper thickness: 10.3 mil • Paper weight: 5.57 oz/y² (189 g/m²) • Giclée printing quality • Opacity: 94%

$32.99 Add to cart

Notable Events

The event everyone associates with Nissan is undoubtedly Pesach (Passover), which in itself commemorates the Exodus (middle). Though many commentaries throughout the ages have differed on which holiday is the holiest, Pesach is certainly the one whereby a collective identity was formed, where a people discovered who they really were. Moshe himself embodied this discovery, growing up in Egyptian royalty and learning the true nature of his origins.

Moshe then made the sacrifice to abandon the life he knew on the path towards reestablishment, as did his people. Though bondage was beyond tortuous, the courage it took for Yisrael to uproot themselves and take faith in a cause, to assert their independence despite the odds, is admirable.

Pesach is special because it evokes the process of wandering, the migration into the unknown. Hence, the bread eaten on Pesach is matzah (making up the horns of Aries), which cannot rise due to the constraints of travel.

Similarly, Nissan also saw the building of the tabernacle (shown above the Exodus), the temporary abode of physical divinity until a proper Temple could be built.

As well, Nissan saw the landing of Noah’s ark on Mount Ararat; though the flood was over, he had not yet disembarked.

Lastly, Nissan had the deaths of all three forefathers (their names emblazoned on Yehuda’s cloak). Life ending on the first month of the year, coupled with that idea that all three of them share the same death month, bodes with the same cyclical concept. The search for roots and looking towards the future are what keep a people and their generations strong.